HE>i

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He must become greater; I must become less.” John 3:30

I recently started seeing the above logo on bumper stickers. Yesterday I saw it painted on the back window of a car.  It took me a moment the first time I saw it to decipher the sign “>” which is used in math to signify “greater than”.  It turns out that there is company in Hawaii that developed this logo to mean that “He” (Jesus) must increase and “I” must decrease.

It’s actually a clothing company with two stores in Hawaii and one in Newport Beach, CA that makes hats and other accessories using the logo HE>i. The owners came up with the idea in 2003 when they were trying to develop a catchy logo for the store that would fit on a Nokia mobile phone screen. The greater than sign (“>”) reminded them of John 3:30 and their friends encouraged them to do something with it so they started making hats, shirts and stickers, and also event clothing for Christian concerts.  On its web page, the owners describe their purpose:

“Our purpose is to produce quality clothing and accessories to encourage, inspire, and share the good news of our savior, Jesus. We do our best to create simple and original products that provide opportunities for people to share the good news with anyone who asks about our simple logo. Most people have a story about when they first discovered what our logo (HE>I) means – either by figuring it out on their own or having someone share the meaning with them. We love hearing personal stories about how God has used our simple logo to bless and encourage different people around the world!”

And no, this is not a shameless promotion for this company or its products, but it is an affirmation of how people can creatively exhibit their faith in the workplace in a non-threatening and inspiring way.    I love this approach – kind of like a modern day sign of the fish to be a witness to others.  What I think is interesting is that we are now seeing this logo on the East Coast of the United States on cars which means that it has gained traction in the marketplace.

The only parallel in my own experience of being creative was in figuring out how to be a Christian lawyer to non-Christian clients and colleagues.  That took a little ingenuity due to strict rules of professional conduct.  In the latter years of my practice I stumbled on an easy way to introduce Christianity into the conversation.  I would tell new clients that although I charged for actual work that I performed for them on an hourly basis, I would add them to my list of clients that I prayed for every day – no charge. Just part of the service.  I told them this even regardless of whether I knew if they were Christians or not.  If asked, which I usually was, I would tell them that I prayed a prayer modeled on the Prayer of Jabez,  an obscure Old Testament prayer found in 1 Chronicles 4:9-10  made popular by Rick Warren who wrote a book about it several years ago. I did this for many years and no one ever said “No, don’t pray for us.” More often, I was asked what the Prayer of Jabez was about, which started a different conversation.

The challenge here is for you to be creative in your witness to those around you – in the marketplace or social gatherings.  Try and think of something unique that introduces Christianity into the conversation so that it becomes part of the dialogue, instead of a discussion which is only held in Church or at a bible study.  You may not be able to think of something like HE>i, but you might get a sticker from the company and use it as a conversation piece.  It might lead to a life saving conversation.

You can get HE>i stickers here: http://hegreaterthani.com/collections/stickers

Bill Mann

 

 

 

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